Planetsexternal image planets.jpg

This research will guide 3rd - 5th grade students to discover what constitutes a planet and the names of the planets in the Milky Way galaxy. Each planet is a different distance from the sun, has its own mass, time of rotation and revolution, number of moons, and size. The purpose of this research is to collect, organize, and graph similar data about the planets and then compare the numerical data associated with the planets using mean, median, and mode.


Iowa Core Curriculum Essential Concepts and Skills


Mathematics - Data analysis and probability
Represent and analyze data using tallies, pictographs, tables, line plots, bar graphs, circle graphs and line graphs.
  • Construct and analyze frequency tables, bar graphs, picture graphs, and line plots and use them to address a question.
  • Compare different representations of the same data and evaluate how well each representation shows important aspects of the data.
  • Use their understanding of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals to construct and analyze circle graphs and line graphs.

Describe the distribution of the data using mean, median, mode or range.
  • Learn to compare related data sets, noting the similarities and differences between the two sets and develop the idea of a "average" value.
  • Learn to select and use measures of center: mean, median and mode and apply them to describing data sets.
  • Begin to conceptually explore the meaning of mean as the balance point for the data set.

Science - Earth and Space
Understand and apply knowledge of the properties, movements, and locations of objects in our solar system
  • Most objects in the solar system are in regular and predictable motion.
  • Eight planets and many other objects revolve around our Sun in predictable patterns. These planets and objects are composed of varied materials

Literacy
Reading
Use a variety of skills and strategies to comprehend nonfiction and informational text.
Study graphic cues:
  • Titles
  • Headings
  • Photos
  • Illustrations
  • Charts
  • Tables
  • Graphs
Use comprehension strategies:
  • Predict and verify
  • Draw inferences
  • Identify main ideas
  • Summarize
  • Draw conclusions
  • Evaluate
  • Synthesize

Writing
Engage in the information literacy process: access, evaluate, and communicate information and ideas.
Access information:
  • Generate questions to guide the research process.
  • Narrow a topic.
  • Locate research materials through print and electronic sources and interviews.
Evaluate information:
  • Authority
  • Coverage
  • Currency
  • Relevance
Communicate information and ideas:
  • Use information accurately, responsibly, and ethically.
  • Adhere to a consistent format for documentation.
  • Use technology to communicate research findings.


21st Century Skills - Technology Literacy
Utilize digital tools and resources to investigate real-world issues, answer questions, or solve problems.
  • Create a plan or process that utilizes digital tools and resources to investigate and answer issues, questions, or problems.
  • Locate, organize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
  • Access information for specific purposes, and assess the validity of the information source.
  • Identify, select, and organize data. Discuss and describe the results.




Dewey Decimal Numbers and Search Terms

Use these subjects and numbers to help you narrow your search.

Dewey Areas
500 - Science
500.5 - Space sciences
520 - Astronomy
523.1 - Outer space
523.2 - Solar system
523.4 - Planets
523.4 - Planets AND exploration
523.41 - Planets AND Mercury
523.42 - Planets AND Venus
523.43 - Planets AND Mars
523.45 - Planets AND Jupiter
523.46 - Planets AND Saturn
523.47 - Planets AND Uranus
523.48 - Planets AND Neptune
523.9 - Satellites
525 - Earth
629.47 - Space vehicles

Keyword Search Terms
Planets, Solar System, Astronomy, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, heavenly bodies, outer space, planetary meteorology, satellites



Encyclopedias external image encyclopedia.jpg

Scholastic Children's Encyclopedia (Scholastic Reference, 2004, YR 031S)
Found in the Youth Reference section of the Rod Library.
Search: Look up individual planet names, which are arranged alphabetically.
There is a page of information on each planet.

World Book Student Encyclopedia (World Book Inc., 2010, **www.worldbookonline.com**)
Go to IowaAEA online (//www.iowaaeaonline.org//) and click on World Book Web.
Use the school log in and password and then select World Book Student.
Search: Planets. Also search the tables under the search results.
This is a good general information source on planets.



Dictionaries external image dictionary.jpg

Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary. (Merriam-Webster, 2004;2006, YR 423 M, http://www.merriam-webster.com/)
Found in the Youth Reference section of the Rod Library or online.
Search: Planets. Entries are arranged alphabetically.
There is a nice table of information about the planets.



Atlas external image World-Atlas1.jpg

Atlas of the World (National Geographic, 2005, Map REF G1021 .N38 2005)
Found in the Map Reference section of the Rod Library.
Search: Space. Look in the table of contents.
There is just a small section on planets, but there is a great chart filled with numerical information on the planets.



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Astronomers : from Copernicus to Crisp (Compass Point Books, 2009, J 520.92 J25A)
Found in the Juvenile non-fiction section of the Cedar Rapids Library.
Search: Look in the table of contents for people who interest you.
Part of the Mission Science series, the book gives short biographies on famous early astronomers and continues to astronomers in our day. Some lesser-known astronomers are also included.



Subject Encyclopedias, Atlases, Almanacs external image books.jpg

Gale Encyclopedia of Science (Gale, 2008)
Go to Rod Library (//http://www.library.uni.edu///) and then to Databases A-Z.
Choose “G” and then select //Gale Virtual Reference Library (Thomson Gale)// and use UNI password.
Select Science, and then select Gale Encyclopedia of Science.
Search: Planets. Once in an article, there will be many links to information on each of the planets. You can choose dates of publication and target audience in the advanced search.
These articles are brief, but are current and accurate. They will provide a good overview of the planets.

First Space Encyclopedia (DK, 2008, YR 520 F)
Found in the Youth Reference section of the Rod Library.
Search: Find Solar System in the Table of Contents.
There are amazing photographs along with basic facts about the solar system.

National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space (National Geographic, 2005, REF TL787.5 .N38 2005)
Found in the Reference section of the Rod Library.
Search: Find Solar System in the Table of Contents.
A clear and basic book about space, with essays, charts, and graphs. It also has beautiful photography.







Atlas of the Universe (Simon & Schuster, 2008, YR 520G)
Found in the reference section of the Rod Library.
Search: Look for the Solar System section in the Table of Contents.
Atlas contains small tidbits of information about space, from the solar system to the stars. It is very up-to-date and contains numerical information about each of the planets.

The World Almanac and Book of Facts (World Almanac, 2009, REF AY67.N5 W7) and World Almanac for Kids (World Almanac, 2009, YR 310 W)
Found in the reference section of the Rod Library. The Almanac for Kids is found in the Youth Reference section.
Search: Look for Planets in the General Index in the back of the book.
Both almanacs have information on thousands of subjects in an easy-to-read format. There are a few pages of information on the planets, including a comprehensive chart of numerical data on each planet.



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The swamps of Sleethe : poems from beyond the solar system by Jack Prelutsy (Knopf, 2009, J 811 P91SW)
Go to the online Cedar Rapids Public Library (//http://www.crlibrary.org///), then select Search Our Catalog. Select Power Search, and type Planets as the word or phrase and type Poetry as the subject.
Search: In the Children’s non-fiction section of the Cedar Rapids Library.
This book contains nineteen poems about weird imaginary planets and the creatures that live on them.

Comets, stars, the Moon, and Mars: space poems and paintings by Douglas Florian(Harcourt, 2007, Y 821 F)

Go to the Rod Library website (//http://www.library.uni.edu///)
Select Databases A-Z and select WorldCat (//http://www.worldcat.org///).
In the Advanced Search, type Planets for the Keyword and Poetry for the subject.
Search: In the Youth Collection of Rod Library.
This book contains twenty lighthearted poems about space.




Magazine Article external image CLIPART_Magazine.GIF

Author unknown. (2009, May). Our solar system. National Geographic Young Explorer, 3(7), 12-21.
Go to to AEA Online (//http://www.iowaaeaonline.org///) , then to EBSCO, and log in with school password.
Choose the Elementary School Magazine Collection and the Primary Search.
Search: Type Planets AND “solar system” in the search box. In the Limit your results section, check Full Text, Look for magazines published from January 2009 to December 2010, and choose Periodical for the publication type.
This article has facts and numerical data about each of the planets in the solar system.




Newspaper Article external image newspaper3.gif


Go to to AEA Online (//http://www.iowaaeaonline.org///) , then to EBSCO, and log in with school password.
Choose Searchasaurus (Elementary and Middle School Magazine Collection)
Search: Type Planets AND “solar system” in the search box. When the results come up, choose Newspapers.
This article contains numerical data about each of the planets.




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Colgren Communications. (2006). Exploring Space: The Sun and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Go to United Streaming (//http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com///) and log in
Search: Type Planets in the search box and choose Grades 3-5. Continue narrowing by choosing Full Video.
This video shows photography, 3-D animation, and graphics that showcase the sun and inner terrestrial planets of the solar system.


Colgren Communications. (2006). Exploring Space: The Outer Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Go to United Streaming (//http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com///) and log in.
Search: Type Planets in the search box and choose Grades 3-5. Continue narrowing by choosing Full Video.
This video explores the outer planets of our solar system: the four gas giants—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune—and Pluto.





Your Teacher Librarian external image School_Clip_Art_160.jpg

Have questions? Confused? Just don’t know what to do next or where to find the specific information you are searching for? Come right over and talk to me, your teacher librarian. I know a lot about the books in the library and the online resources available. I would be glad to help!